You Get What You Pay For

Interesting conversation recently. It began with the subject of the fast food workers who were striking to earn $15 an hour. It continued with a discussion of how the middle class in the United States has been hollowed out, with meaningful, well-paying jobs going overseas as consumers search for the least-expensive items without regards to the impacts of those purchasing decisions.

McDonaldsFrom there, we talked about the high cost of Starbucks coffee versus the coffee at McDonald’s. I pointed out that, while there may be many reasons to explain the price difference between Starbucks and McDonald’s, one main reason has to be that Starbuck’s provides a relatively generous set of benefits to front-line employees, compared with McDonald’s. Kind of illustrates the point about the impacts of our purchasing decisions.

starbucks-barista-620xaA gross oversimplification, of course, but if we choose to buy from companies that poorly compensate their employees, we are sending a message. If we choose to buy from companies that treat employees better, we are sending another message.

 

Virtual Work World

As I have shared over the past few months, my 12+ year job working remotely for a company in the US came to an end in mid-February. Since then, I have been searching for a new full-time position here in Bangkok without luck. Along the way, I have managed to pick up many freelance jobs, some of which are one-off projects and others of which are ongoing. While I don’t feel entirely comfortable with this uncertain income stream, I am enjoying the variety of work, workplaces, and clients.

For example, one client is the CEO of a start-up social media marketing company. I have the opportunity to provide feedback and coaching around his performance, his business model, and how he is structuring the organization as it rapidly grows. Along the way, I’ve had the opportunity to do some interesting things such as write the script he used to shoot a video infomercial and accompany him to the studio here in Bangkok where it was shot.

As you can see, it was shot in a green-screen environment and the “studio” was added digitally (visible in the monitor on the left). The interviewer and the CEO are sitting on two chairs in front of a green sheet of fabric but on the screen, it appears they are sitting at a desk in a fancy TV studio.

Considering I graduated as a Communication major with a TV Production emphasis, this was one of the few times that I have directly used the skills in the workplace that I studied in university!

So far, knock on wood, each project seems to lead to additional projects and new contacts. I would still like to secure a full-time position at a firm and I continue to apply at different companies. But for the time being, the freelance approach seems to be working out well enough. In the back of my mind, I feel I have to trust that this path will lead me to where I need to be. Sometimes, though, it is hard to have the patience to trust that things work out alright over time.