Food in Bangkok: Elvis Suki

Elvis has left the building and is now selling Thai sukiyaki on a street-side restaurant not far from the Hualamphong Railway Station. Recently, my foodie friend Chow (author of the Bangkok Glutton blog and the helpful street food guide, Bangkok’s Top 50 Street Food Stalls) invited me to join her family for dinner at Elvis Suki. One does not decline a street food invitation from Chow and, once again, her choice was excellent.

Sukiyaki is a Japanese style hot pot dish. The Thai version bears only a faint resemblance to the original Japanese version. While there is still a hot pot component available at some restaurants, at other restaurants like Elvis Suki, “suki” refers to a bowl of vegetables and meat, with or without mung bean vermicelli, and with or without broth. The one thing it always has is a super-fiery dipping sauce made of chili paste, chilies, lime juice, and cilantro. The above example is a seafood suki with broth.

For a little more clarity into what’s inside the bowl, here’s a “dry” version (no broth) of a pork suki. Lots of green veggies and, despite being pork, a piece of squid made it into the bowl. The suki is satisfying, inexpensive, and easy to eat. The dipping sauce is seriously spicy. Be warned.

Elvis Suki is also known for their grilled seafood. Here is a plate full of cockles served with the dipping sauce. The seafood is very fresh, although I’m not a big fan of the flavor of cockles.

 

A very un-Thai specialty are these scallops grilled with a piece of fatty pork, slathered in butter and loads of garlic. You wouldn’t think scallops and pork would go together, but they actually make a nice pairing. And with all that butter, who could complain?

One other specialty is this hard-to-see whole fish served wrapped in banana leaf and covered with pandan and kaffir lime leaves. The brownish mixture is actually a fine mixture of chopped herbs including lemongrass and galangal root (related to ginger). Needless to say, the fish has this incredible aroma after having been grilled with these herbs.

Elvis Suki is worth a visit if you enjoy experiencing true local cuisine. There is also a good homemade ice cream shop right next door so you are covered for dessert, too. Usually it is hard to explain where you can find these types of restaurants but Elvis Suki’s owners make it easy: the GPS coordinates are on the menu!

 

0 thoughts on “Food in Bangkok: Elvis Suki

  1. Perfect for the international geocacher! So how much of the sauce can you handle? Would a wimpy American be better off just doing the Breatharianism approach to the hot sauce??   

  2. Found the ice cream lol. One Spanish restaurant offers fish cooked or baked in a bag so that the flavor of the fish and herbs are not lost.

  3. Cockles and scallops are not too bad for me. Probably a lot of folks here would eat fish if there weren’t so many bones to pick. I don’t know how anyone living in your area could stay slim.

  4. Yum it all looks so good and cockles look like the steamer clams we buy from up on Hoods Canal.I am wondering if they are very much the same.I bet the fish wrapped in banana leaf and covered with pandan and kaffir lime leaves, in a mixture of all of the herbs does have an incredible aroma.Hubby says his mouth is watering<:)

  5. Hmm. I thought the fish was some type of tamale or sticky rice in banana leaves (that dimsum dish?)When I visit Thailand, you’re gonna have to take me around… I have no clue how to interpret the map 😛

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